Winiwini Gurruwiwi
Yiḏaki
123cm
ID: 965-20

$265.00

ID: 965-20

Out of stock

Description

Winiwini Gurruwiwi
Stringybark (Eucalyptus tetradonta)
123cm
Year: 2021
ID: 965-20

Yiḏaki

Yiḏaki are didjeridus that are specific to North East Arnhem land in Australia’s Northern Territory, where the instrument originates. The term yiḏaki is used in Yolŋu (the nation of North East Arnhem land Aboriginal people) languages as the generic name for the didjeridu. The name yiḏaki is most correctly used for instruments from this region that have been solely made and decorated by Yolŋu people.

Yiḏaki were originally limited to the Northern extremes of Australia, in particular Arnhem land. In relatively recent years, yiḏaki spread to other parts of Australia and the rest of the world. Yiḏaki began to be manufactured in different ways and with different types of materials. It became commonly known as the didjeridu, a non-Aboriginal term for the instrument. Through it’s International popularisation as the didjeridu, it has been somewhat displaced from it’s spiritual and cultural roots that are still held by the Yolŋu in Arnhem land today. The Yolŋu are masters of making and playing the yiḏaki and are well known Internationally for their quality instruments and complex yiḏaki playing styles.

Yolŋu artists carefully select naturally occurring termite hollowed tree stems, which are cut and shaped into suitable sounding instruments. They are made with certain desired acoustics that can vary dramatically between different clans, from high pitch to very low. Typical yiḏaki have small natural wooden mouthpieces around 30mm in diameter and taper out to a diameter of around 100mm at the distal end. Having a small mouthpiece means they require less air to play and produce sound easily as a result.

The vast majority of yiḏaki are made from Gadayka (Stringybark – Eucalyptus Tetrodonta). Gadayka is by far the most common tree in the North East Arnhem land region and often grows in a conical shape, which is desired for acoustic reasons. Occasionally, Guŋurru ( Woolybutt – Eucalyptus Miniata) is used.

In appearance yiḏaki seem to be a simple instrument, however the playing styles of the Yolŋu are complex and require many years of practice. Yiḏaki are played by vibrating the lips which produces a basic tone. This tone is maintained continually using cyclic breathing and is varied through use of the playing pressure, the tension in the cheeks, the use of the diaphragm, the tongue position and the use of the voice.

Traditionally, yiḏaki are painted with naturally occurring red, white, black and yellow earth pigments. In recent years acrylic paints began to be used. Both the artwork and the sound and overall style of the yiḏaki denote cultural history and law. 

The maker of this yiḏaki is Winiwini (Larry) Gurruwiwi. Winiwini is the son of senior Galpu clan custodian for the yiḏaki, Djalu’ Gurruwiwi. Winiwini is commonly known as Larry and is well known Internationally for his virtuoso yiḏaki playing that can be heard on youtube and in various documentaries.

The Galpu clan attribute the point of origin to Djugirriŋura. Typical Galpu style yiḏaki are often referred to as Djuŋgirrin – referring directly to the place of origin. Djuŋgirriŋura is near the Galpu homeland Ŋaypinya (close to Caledon Bay) It is here that Wititj, the Ancestral Rainbow Serpent first came out of the ground. At this place two clansmen, a Marrakulu (Yirritja) and Galpu (Dhuwa), were making and testing what could be interpreted as the first yidaki. The Galpu mans’ yiḏaki was longer and deeper than the Marrakulu mans’ yiḏaki. The West wind, Barra, made itself known to the Galpu man and he felt its power as it blew through the yiḏaki. He blew the yiḏaki with that feeling and produced a strong powerful sound. As people gathered and began dancing, the clouds progressed through white to black followed by the red lightening and black darkness, intimating the Galpu clan relationship with Wititj and the associated tempest. 

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